Heartiness Approach Program

Have you heard this before? If you haven't you will. Researchers (not those paid by the food industry) continue to discover health threats from the industrialized foods. This step is put first because doing it will reap huge rewards. This is a very hard step because you will seem to be left with a limited range of choices for food to eat. Keep the faith, read on and do your best.
 
Balanced means that whenever you eat something you include good foods from these groups; proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and vegetables. Balanced also means to eat appropriate quantities of each group. We have other articles that go into greater detail about the balance. Some foods do a better nutritional job when combined with complementary foods. Plus, to process our food intake our bodies need a variety of micro-nutrients to properly create the healthy substances our body uses for functioning and growth. We get a better balance of those micro-nutrients when we consume a balanced meal or snack. Unbalanced meals and snacks often become negative energy drains on our bodies or become unhealthy fat. Our resilient bodies can handle unbalance eating for a long time but eventually these wonderful human bodies begin to falter without correct nutritional input.
 
Step 2 mentioned good fats and these important nutritional substances require more exploration. Fats have been considered a bad choice in any form or quantity, at least that is the impression one gets when listening to popular media. Our bodies need good fats. Staturated fats are vital to our body. Coconut oil is an excellent fat for eating and cooking. Olive oil can be used for low heat cooking. Lard is great for cooking. Eat butter from a good source in abundance. See the fats section for further information
 
Surgeons began seeing inflammation in all their heart patients. Now we know from much more research that inflammation adds to the cause of:
  • Inflammatory bowel disease including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. 
  • Arthritis and Joint disease
  • Linked to heart disease
  • Auto immune disorders such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease
  • Colorectal cancer and a higher risk of many other cancers
  • Asthma, COPD, Bronchitis all show inflammation in the lungs. With inflammation, fluid occurs and airways narrow.
  • Dental Gum Damage which can lead to heart disease and dementia
  • Increases Insulin Resistance
  • Obesity is a a major cause of inflammation. Chronic inflammation can influence hunger signals and slow down metabolism, so you eat more and burn fewer calories making weight loss more difficult
  • Inflammation interferes with bone growth.
  • Inflammation in the brain is now linked to depression
 Anti-Inflammatory Foods
  • Beans and Lentils
  • Berries
  • Garlic
  • Salmon
  • Cherries
  • Vegetables and Fruit
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Tumeric
  • Olive Oil
  • Nts
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Grape Juice
  • Pomegranate Juice
 
No debate here. But how does one follow through? and what is proper exercise?
 
Finding motivation can come in many ways and the most effective I have found involves someone else. Get an accountability partner. That way two people start exercising and stick with it. 
 
Pain is not gain contrary to what we have heard. Pain means injury and injury requires healing. Causing our muscles to work harder than usual sets wonderful processes in motion which lead to increased strength, balance, and mass, very important gains for health and well being.  Excess work can injure tissues which causes the pain. When the tissues heal the muscle will have gained but during the healing process the muscle could not work as hard due to the inhibition of pain. Some injuries may be so severe that the exercises has to take a few days off while the pain subsides. Slow and steady wins the race. Work enough so you feel the workout but without pain. This allows more frequent workouts and thus steady gain.
 
My recommendation involves using cardio exercise as a means to warm up, getting your muscles limber and your heart rate elevated. Use a resistance exercise routine to work your muscle groups. Example routines are included on the website. I also recommend a stretching, relaxing routine at the end of your day. Incorporate a progression for your routines, meaning that you increase the resistance, the number of sets, or the repetitions, depending on the exercise. Don't rush the progression, let your body tell you when enough is enough. Eventually your progression will exceed your time or your body capability.
 
Stress is one of the biggest catalyst in our lives related to disease. The Adrenal Gland and cortisol are greatly affected by stress. Suffice it to say we have stress in our lives. It is imperative that we get it under control. Even if we cannot change what causes stress, we have the ability to cope with that stress differently. 
Dale Carnegie used to say, "What is the worst thing that can happen?" Then you play that out in your mind, play what you would do and how you will handle it. Then more than likely it will never happen and what ever happens will be less than the worst. 
Dr Diana Schwarzbein has a wonderful list to de-stressors. I list some of them for you.
  • Acupuncture
  • Adopt a cat, dog or other pet
  • Aromatherapy
  • Avoid stressful TV programs
  • Balance your work schedule with relaxation time
  • Dancing
  • Develop affection in relationships, (laughing, hugging, being together)
  • Eat dinner with our family on a regular basis
  • Forgive
  • Get adequate sleep
  • Go to the movies more often
  • Group therapy
  • Individual counseling
  • Ave a massage
  • Join a book club, health club, kitting group etc
  • Learn to delegate
  • Practice Yoga
  • Learn to say no
  • Meditate
  • Meet friends for meal time
  • Play sports
  • Pray
  • Take a stress-management class
  • Long hot baths
  • Ten minute walks
  • Take up a new hobby 
  • Treat yourself to a new book, dress, hair-do.
  • Use your imagination
 
Lack of sleep can undo everything you have worked for. 
  • Avoid over-stimulation prior to going to sleep. Two hours prior to bed time turn off the television, remove yourself from computer screens, tablets and cell phones. 
  • Reduce the amount of fluid in the evening hours 
  • Drink an herbal tea to relax you. (Small amount of fluid)
  • Block your clock. Do not look at the time in the night if you wake up. 
  • Make sure you have the right pillow and mattress
  • Set your body clock. Go to bed near the same time each night. Get up without an alarm clock when possible.
  • Exercise daily
  • Use your bed for sleep and being intimate with your spouse. 
  • Is your room dark enough and cool or warm enough
  • Make sure you are not hungry but do not overeat at night
  • No stimulates in the evening (sugar, chocolate, caffeine, nicotine, alcohol)
  • Create a bedtime ritual ( warm bath, music, candles, aromas)
Stimulates raise adrenaline levels. This causes you to age much faster because you are causing your body to use up more biochemicals than you are making to replace them. 
Caffeine causes the adrenaline in your body to become more potent because it blocks the breakdown of adrenaline keeping you in the fight or flight mode. 
 
Low Serotonin Levels cause cravings for sugar, alcohol, caffeine, nicotine and or recreational drugs. 
  • Increase your serotonin levels by eating foods that are rich in Tryptophan:
  • Almonds, cottage cheese, oatmeal, peanut butter, peanuts, shellfish, tuna, turkey
Taper off stimulates
  • Use a friend
  • Use a group
  • Use prayer

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